Unproductive Meetings

Recently, I decided to take a “themed” approach to my book selections.  The first theme has been centered around a new approach to my work habits.  I asked myself three questions (selected book):

  1. How can I learn more effectively and efficiently? (Make It Stick)
  2. How can I spend time in a deeper state of concentration so the most important tasks always get my best work? (Deep Work)
  3. How can I prioritize my day around getting the most important tasks done? I.e. owning my schedule instead of letting it own me. (Essentialism -thanks, JT)

As I engaged with these books and started applying their lessons to my day-to-day workflow, I wondered where else could their principles be applied in a startup setting.  For the latter two books, the answer soon became clear, meetings.

Why do some teams leave meetings without accomplishing their goals and how can they apply the theses of the books above in order to walk away from meetings feeling ready to execute?

Deep Work = (Time Worked x Intensity of Work) – Distractions

How many meetings have you been in that include a “brainstorming” session? The validity of brainstorming has come into question in recent years due to the increased propensity for social-loafing, regression to the mean, and production blocking.  While brainstorming is meant to increase creativity, we are actually at our most creative when our work is done in solitude.

Without great solitude no serious work is possible. – Picasso

Instead of asking everyone to express several ideas all at once, encourage (or perhaps require) members of the meeting to spend 1-2 hours beforehand working through the topic of the meeting individually in order to allow them to achieve a state of deep work on the problem at hand.  The results will be of higher quality and buy-in can still be achieved since everyone will have something to contribute during the meeting.

Essentialism = Less but Better

While leaving any meeting with a plan of attack is a must, it is a partial completion of the actual requirement.  Great meetings end with a prioritized list of to-dos and deadlines.  We all have the tendency to want “more” and to chase shiny objects.  This is especially true early on in a company’s life when there are many things to do.

However, leaving a meeting with ten top priorities is, as Greg McKeown puts it, “ironic.” Make it a practice to prioritize what can be accomplished in the time period given.  In my experience the following limits have worked well:

  • Quarterly: 3-4 priorities
  • Monthly: 2-3
  • Bi-Weekly: 1-2

Additionally, encourage your team to say “no” when they feel overwhelmed or that a task is unimportant to the greater goal at hand.  Healthy debate will lead to an even clearer list of priorities on which to execute.

Leaving a meeting with no clear direction (decision maker, execution plan, priorities) is one of the biggest wastes of company resources imaginable. We often think about tangible costs but almost never compute the costs of pulling multiple team-members into an hours long meeting.  If you’re having the issue of multiple, yet unproductive, meetings I encourage you to try some of these tactics geared toward the individual to make your group sessions more effective.

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